Slow Foodies are often asked to define Slow Food, and it can be difficult to come up with the perfect “elevator” pitch. There are many misconceptions about Slow Food. It is definitely NOT vegetarian, as a fairly recent TV news story implied. It is not about cooking or chewing your food slowly. It is not even about organic or “health” food, although we think that food produced in this way is healthier for our bodies and our cultures. Here is a good, concise definition of Slow Food from an article about Carlo Petrini in the Independent:

From producer to plate: What is Slow Food?

Slow Food ā€“ Petrini’s term ā€“ is used to signal awareness of a food’s origin, on the part of the producer and “co-producer”, the movement’s name for the consumer. Slow Food shies away from the word “consumer” because “by being informed about how our food is produced and actively supporting those who produce it, we become a part of and a partner in the production process”.

Promoted by members of the organisation, the term stipulates that the food should “taste good, that it should be produced in a clean way which fully respects the environment, human health and animal welfare” and that “food producers are paid a fair wage”.

Slow Food is necessarily regional, promoting and protecting local produce. Its aim: “To counteract fast food and fast life, the disappearance of local food traditions and people’s dwindling interest in the food they eat, where it comes from, how it tastes and how food choices affect the rest of the world.”